03252017Headline:

Be ready to get your thinking cap on

Put on your thinking cap

The old saying ‘get your thinking cap on’ may not be too much off the mark. Researchers at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, have discovered that the person’s capability to understand could be improved by wearing headgear that delivers mild electric current for the brain.

After undergoing 20 minutes of transcranial stimulation, participants received a learning process that involved deciding which links on the game controller matched particular colors. Scientists realized that subjects learned from their mistakes faster than without electric current passing through their brain and made fewer mistakes.

Put on your thinking cap

Put on your thinking cap

Among the study’s co-writers, Geoffrey Woodman, explained the result was plain to view about the electroencephalogram, with “successful rate definitely better than that seen in studies of drugs or other forms of mental treatment”.

His friend Robert Reinhart, who direct the research, said: “What we discovered, that will be so fascinating, is the fact that whenever we up-regulate this unique brain activity we are able to make volunteers more precise when doing an activity, more cautious, careful, less bold. So that they make an error and following the error is clearly slower and more accurate.”

Be ready to get your thinking cap on

Be ready to get your thinking cap on

how they react

The limit used to deliver energy for the brain is just a traditional implement usually employed for EEGs, tests designed to use a digital monitoring system to measure electrical activity within the brain.

“It just feels like a little irritation or tingling feeling, which is doesn’t hurt and really small. It seems much more powerful than it really is,” stated clinical trial participant Laura McClenahan.

The effects of the results extend beyond the potential to enhance understanding; it’s believed it might also provide medical advantages while in the treatment of problems like schizophrenia or ADHD.

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