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Anja Niedringhaus killed on assignment in Afghanistan

Tributes for photographer  Journalist Anja Niedringhaus killed on assignment in Afghanistan

The bullet holes inside the vehicle that was carrying two foreign journalists in Afghanistan are a reminder of the chaotic conclusion which met photographer Anja Niedringhaus.

She was going within the vehicle along side other AP correspondent Kathy Gannon on project near Khost whenever a cop is believed to have opened fire to the car. Gannon is considered secure, however, Niedringhaus died immediately.

Afghanistan Photographer Killed

Tributes for photographer Journalist Anja Niedringhaus killed on assignment in Afghanistan

Tributes have poured in from writers all around the world who talked of her courageous yet comfortable character.

When asked that was her favorite picture she just responds every single day another one, and them all.

Award winner picture taken by Anja Niedringhaus

Award winner picture taken by Anja Niedringhaus

Her work led to her team winning the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of Iraq in 2005.

Within an atmosphere that could easily have made her a sceptic, her pictures show a temperature for human life.

Anja Niedringhaus (12 October 1965 – 4 April 2014) was a German photojournalist who worked for the Associated Press (AP)

Anja Niedringhaus (12 October 1965 – 4 April 2014) was a German photojournalist who worked for the Associated Press (AP)

Anja Niedringhaus (12 October 1965 – 4 April 2014) was a German photojournalist who worked for the Associated Press (AP).

She was the sole girl on the group of 11 AP photographers that won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for protection of the Iraq Conflict. That same year she was awarded the International Women’s Media Foundation’s Courage in Literature award.

Niedringhaus had covered Afghanistan for quite some time before she was murdered on Friday, 4 April 2014, while since the presidential election, after an Afghan policeman opened fire in the car she was waiting in in a gate, section of an election convoy.

Niedringhaus started working as a freelance photographer at age 17 while still in high-school, and was created in Höxter, North Rhine-Westphalia. In 1989, she included the fall of the Berlin Wall for the German paper Göttinger Tageblatt.
Niedringhaus began full-time are a photojournalist in 1990 when she joined the European Pressphoto Agency in Frankfurt, Germany. As EPA’s Chief Photographer she used the first 10 years of her job since the conflicts within the former Yugoslavia.

In 2001, Niedringhaus captured the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks in Nyc and moved to Afghanistan, where she spent 3 months since the fall of the Taliban. In 2002, she joined Associated Press, for whom she’s worked in Turkey, Afghanistan, the Gaza Strip, Israel, Kuwait and Iraq. On 23 October 2005, she received the IWMF Courage in Journalism Award from American broadcaster Bob Schieffer in a ceremony in Nyc.

In 2007, Niedringhaus was awarded a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University. She was the main 69th class of Nieman Fellows where she learned culture, history, religion along with the problems of sexuality within the Middle East as well as their effect on the growth of foreign-policy within the United States as well as other Developed nations. Founded in 1938, the Nieman program will be the earliest mid-career fellowship for writers on the planet. The fellowships are awarded to working journalists of promise and accomplishment for an academic year of study in the college.

Niedringhaus’ work has been displayed in the Museum of Modern Art in Frankfurt, Germany, as well as in museums and galleries elsewhere, including Graz, Austria.

Niedringhaus was killed in the age of 48 within an attack in Afghanistan, while since the nation’s 2014 presidential election.

Niedringhaus was killed in the age of 48 within an attack in Afghanistan, while since the nation's 2014 presidential election.

Niedringhaus was killed in the age of 48 within an attack in Afghanistan, while since the nation’s 2014 presidential election.

Other AP correspondent, Kathy Gannon, 60-year old Canadian, underwent emergency surgery and was critically hurt while in the attack. The attack happened in a checkpost to the outskirts of Khost area in Tani Area, where the writers were a part of an independent election commission convoy delivering ballots under the protection of Afghan authorities and the Afghan National Army. As the two were waiting inside the vehicle, an Afghan police unit commander called Naqibullah went around their vehicle and opened fire while shouting “Allahu Akbar” (God Is Very Good); capturing both ladies in the rear seat. Following the strike, the official surrendered, and was taken into custod.

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